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ORSI, FABIO - Memory of a safe Place / La Forest a non fa pura

Format: LP + mag
Label & Cat.Number: Silentes / 13 issue#1
Release Year: 2013
Note: this new series from the Italian ambient label combines acoustic & visual art: a lim. LP + large A4 booklet (16 pages) with b/w photographs of the same artist; FABIO ORSI starts the series with time-suspending dense transcension drones & beautiful forest pictures; lim. 250 copies, white vinyl
Price (incl. 19% VAT): €18.00


More Info

"issue #1

phonographic record
FABIO ORSI MEMORY OF A SAFE PLACE

photographic work
FABIO ORSI LA FORESTA NON FA PAURA

Born in the province of Taranto, in southern Italy, after many years spent in Naples and now based in Berlin, Fabio Orsi sits among the most interesting names of the European electronic and experimental scene. Following his early output on A Silent Place and Smallvoices, his music works have been published by many other labels worldwide, including Last visible Dog, Porter Records, Boring Machines and Silentes. His talent has become an estabilished reality thanks to his abilities in finding a nice balance between experimentation and melody, sounding intimate and abstract at the same time, using drones of a concrte and electronic nature, acoustic instruments, field recordings, synthesizers and computer treatments for his compositions. In addition to his solo work, we would also like to mention his many collaborations with Italian saxophonist and multi-instrumentalist Valerio Cosi and Gianluca Becuzzi a.k.a. Kinetix, and ex-Limbo, that projected their visions into a different perspective. Memory of a Safe Place consists of two long drone-based pieces that explore the pictures collected in La foresta non fa paura (The Forest Is Not Scary). Both tracks slowly build from a distant low frequence humming: Part 1 has a dream-like quality and is one of those numbers suspended in eternity that could easily last forever, a truly healing experience; with its rhythmic elements fading in along the road, Part 2 is more down-to-earth, so to speak, althought if it reminds pretty well the listener of the German Cosmic Couriers of the Seventies. An awesome work for all the Ambient Music fans, Post-Kraut lovers, Hypnagogic dreamers and the Eternal Drone explorers out there.

The standard edition of this issue consists of 250 copies; a limited and hand-numbered edition of 44 copies is also available, it includes a 18x24cm original photograph printed on 310 gr. high quality professional photo-paper." [label info]

www.silentes.net



"Following a small tidal wave of releases, things became quiet for Silent at the end of 2012, it seems. Maybe there is only room for as many CDs? Or maybe there is a need to break away from easy to copy/download CDs and create something that is perhaps more unique, more desirable? Hence, the birth of '13', which takes here the shape of 12" record with 16 A4 page booklet of photography, in an edition of 250 copies. It could have been 50 copies, with different shaped photos or even smaller editions with unique prints. Either way, the photographic aspect is of an equal importance as the music. The series kicks off with Fabio Orsi, doing both music and photography here. Orsi's career started on A Silent Place and Smallvoices, and further developed with releases on labels such as Last Visible Dog, Porter Records, Boring Machines but above all Silentes. Orsi is an ambient composer and uses synthetic and natural sounds to create his music, that fits the black and white photography quite well. Lots of pictures of nature, and with a sound that seems to stem straight from nature this is music that is probably best enjoyed outside - be it that taking a record player into nature is a bit difficult. That's the only downside of such a release I guess, which is otherwise filled with some great music. In 'Part 1', I believe to hear a mass of voice material, cascading freely but seemingly becoming more of a tidal wave, whereas in 'Part 2' it seems to be revolving around a looped guitar of some kind, locked into an eternal hum. Both sides are of course highly minimal with some very slow developments, placed in all the right places, preventing both parts from being just a single minded drone piece, but more a free floating experience in sound. Very sober in execution, both sound and image, but very nice altogether." [FdW/Vital Weekly]