Drone Records
Your cart (0 item)

MANINKARI - Phantasmes

Format: LP
Label & Cat.Number: three:four records TFR020
Release Year: 2013
Note: 39min. soundtrack to a film by THOMAS PANTALACCI, the adequate music for experimental visuals => visionary / surrealistic drones & instrumental fragments, very dark... 'A sensory experience between dream and reality, fantasy and eroticism, awakening and sleep'; great release by the French duo again !
Price (incl. 19% VAT): €16.00


More Info

"Phantasmes is a 50 minutes experimental movie written and directed by Thomas Pantalacci. A sensory experience between dream and reality, fantasy and eroticism, awakening and sleep

For that purpose, the band Maninkari wrote a two-part - one per side - 39 minutes soundtrack with multiple pieces. The tracks are not marked out because here, even silence is vital. It doesnt soothe the tensions, but amplifies the feeling of oddness of the music. Dark ambient, syncopated drumming, dissonant chords Maninkari use all the sonority spectrum, mixing aggressive high-pitched violin with deep and voluptuous bass sounds.

Playing on the thin border between dreaming and awakening, Phantasmes is a mental and physical record; seductive, disturbing and lustful.

Includes a download code for a free download of the album." [label info]

www.three-four.net



"The brothers Charlot return here (see also Vital Weekly 843 and 815) with thirty-nine minutes of music which they recorded for a '50 minute experimental movie written and directed by Thomas Pantalacci' and which is described as as 'a sensory experience between dream and reality, fantasy and eroticism, awakening and sleep'. Usually Maninkari use a lot of percussion, but it seems that in their more recent musical outings they also use other instruments, such as viola, cimbalom, keyboards and samples. And yes, lots of effects. They easily reach for that bit of reverb, to add that extra layer of 'space' and 'mystic' to the music. Thank god, however, not always, and they use it wise and sparsely. Of course I haven't seen the movie, but I can imagine, based on the soundtrack, what it will look like. Dark and moody, but not always as 'loaded' as you would expect. Maninkari also leave room for quieter moments, sparser moments if you will. Sometimes a simple drone is all that we are left with, or even some crackles - it might be the vinyl. But then sometimes the music start to expand, growing, bigger and takes on dramatic courses. For instance on the b-side, somewhere half way through. When that happens, it usually involves percussion, loud and clear - manually and not mechanically played. The dramatic changes in the music made me surely curious about the film. There is a lot of tension in this piece of black vinyl. Excellent mood enhancher." [FdW/Vital Weekly]