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GNOME & SPYBEY - At Willie's Place

Format: CD
Label & Cat.Number: Tourette Records 017
Release Year: 2010
Note: MARK SPYBEY (DEAD VOICES ON AIR, DOWNLOAD, ZOVIET FRANCE, etc.) in collaboration with GNOME aka TONY D'OPORTO; lim. ed. 400 copies only
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"I get the honor of announcing Mark Spibey's collaborative release with Gnome (aka Tony D'Oporto). Gnome and Spybey's At Willie's Place will be released in July on Tourette Records in a limited edition of 400 copies. I've had the distinct privilege of hearing the album. It's a gorgeous journey from the heights of the clouds to the forest floor. It's an album of detailed synthetic warmth populated by remotely ethnic melodic figures which roam the tracks like living creatures. The album reminds of Ariel Kalma, the Residents at their most serene, Coil at their most reflective, Aphex at his most ambient, and Eno at his most melodious. It's mood music for those times when you just aren't quite sure what mood you're in, a beam of welcome morning light pouring through the window after a sleepless night of worry. At Willie's Place is the most vibrant record of electronic music I've heard in quite some time." [label info]

www.touretterecords.com

"Mark Spybey goes on and on, here teaming up with somebody called Gnome, which is one Tony D'Oporto, of whom I never heard. Perhaps a spoiler to the end of the review, but Spybey is not a man to change his tune very much. And why should he? He's happy to play atmospheric music of any kind. Sometimes very ambient, sometimes a bit more krautrock inspired and like on 'At Willie's Place' somewhere in between all of that. The synths play moody, sustaining notes, with occasional arpeggio's, a dash of rhythm is faded in and out and that's it. There is hardly a sense of composition - Spybey and Gnome like the flow of sounds it seems. Now that may all sound like I don't like this record, which is not true. In terms of doing something 'new', I'd say its not on this record, but when we look at this in musical terms, its a great record. It reminded me of ambient house, more than a decade ago, with those arpeggio's, sea sounds, bouncing rhythm occasionally and spacious synthesizers. Music that was once vastly popular, and now is nowhere (although, who knows a revival might be imminent). Not something I hear everyday and that's why I was particular interested in this. Should I have more time in the slow summer period, I'll start my own revival and dig out some lost treasures (Aphex Twin, Silent Records) and play this one as if it were an oldie too." [FdW/Vital Weekly]