Drone Records
Your cart (0 item)

ZEBRA - The Black & White Album

Format: CD
Label & Cat.Number: Symbolic Interaction SIC 014
Release Year: 2008
Note: debut-album of this "post-GOEM project" (consisting of ROEL MEELKOP & FRANS DE WAARD); cover by MEEUW
Price (incl. 19% VAT): €12.00


More Info

Das "Pop"-Projekt (sozusagen die Nachfolge von den eher technoiden GOEM) von FRANS DE WAARD und ROEL MEELKOP berrascht mit zum Teil sehr gradlinigen Beats, Pop-Versatzstcken in neuem Gewand, einem 70er Jahre Disco-Feeling, Glitch-Effekten und weiteren Dingen die nicht unbedingt zusammenpassen, aber es darf hier auch mal etwas "unseriser" zugehen, oder???

"The long awaited debut album of Roel Meelkop and Frans de Waard's post Goem project. They show their love for a good pop song and their love for a bad song also - hacked and spliced together, held together by a set of groovy beats (beasts?). They call it 'Meltpop', symphonic macrosound disco glitch. Includes new versions of their hit single 'Leif Is Leif/Last Night A DJ Saved By File' (final copies of the 7" still available). Great liner notes, great cover by Meeuw." [label info]

"Zbra's The Black & White Album is something of a shaggy dog stray finding a welcome within the SI homestead. According to Roel Meelkop and Frans de Waard (the man who gave you Goem, Kapotte Muziek, and Beequeen, among others), the recording was passed on by any number of potential patrons for being too off-kilter. And in fact much conceptual mischief and general oddity manifests, initially in external dressing, e.g. in scientific graphs with impenetrable textual commentaries, and track durations misrepresenting actual times. The set itself is a collage of techno and disco, noise-mongering, and sampledelic antics, Dream Music for Diamand Redheads being representative; it makes a tentative gestural nod towards Romanticist euphony before morphing into a marching slab of upright techno and a looped voice sample. Last Night A DJ Saves My File digitally as well as morphologically mangles Indeeps 80s classic, peppering it with telephone rings and sundry spicy interpolations. In terms of sonic-conceptual forebears, de Waard and Meelkop's exercise in bricolage-styled playroom mischief - self-styled meltpop - bears a loop-y stamp that nods clearly towards the spirit of :zoviet*france, while the loony leaps from avant- to electro-/disco to pop remind of the likes of KLF or 808 State, or, in brief orgies of low-end technoid minimalism, nudge towards Pan Sonic." [Ear-Rational]

www.kormplastics.nl